4 Simple Things You Should Know About Your Loved One’s Rehab

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Having someone dear to you, like a partner or a family member, who is in drug or alcohol rehab most often means that you’re facing a lot of struggles. These struggles are further exacerbated by questions, doubts, and misconceptions on how professional rehabilitation facilities work.

To help you gain some perspective and allay your fears, here are a few of the things you should know about drug and alcohol rehabilitation for your loved one.

four-simple-things-about-addiction-rehab

1. He is in good hands. Once your loved ones enter rehab, you can rest assured that they are getting the help that they need. This is the time for you to take a deep breath and, somehow, rest a little easier. Your loved ones have a substance abuse problem and they are exactly where they need to be instead of being out in the world further destroying their mind, body, and life with drugs or alcohol.

Being in a rehabilitation facility means they are under close and careful supervision and guidance of rehab professionals who have received special education and training to address these problems.

They will also be surrounded by peers who are also in the same position as your loved ones are in. These peers will provide valuable insights and support system inside.

Your loved ones will also receive plenty of helpful therapy that will allow them to reflect and then eventually address their addictions, behaviors, and attitudes. Additionally, they will also receive medical care, nutritional support, and a balanced diet.

2. It’s nothing personal. During your loved ones’ early days in the rehab facility, his connection and contact with the outside world will be highly restricted and strictly discouraged. At this time, the main focus is in their recovery and they won’t be able to communicate using their cellphones or by telephone either. All these measures are in place so that they will have very minimal distractions as they put all their efforts on staying sober. These rules are common in most facilities, so don’t take it personally. Also, due to confidentiality and privacy reasons, the rehab staff may also withhold information from you unless it is in the best interest of your loved ones’ recovery, and it will be up to them to tell you themselves.

3. Your involvement and support is important. While your loved ones are in rehab and are working on their recovery, it is now time for you to equip yourself with information about the dynamics of substance abuse and addiction. This will help give you deeper insight into the issue, as well as increase your ability to provide the support your loved ones need.

You will also be required to participate in dialogues and counselling later in their recovery. The staff will also give you advice on how to  avoid enabling your loved ones and how to avoid relapse when your loved ones come back out into the “outside” world.

4. Seek help and healing for yourself. We understand that your problem with substance abuse does not end with your loved ones entering rehab. In fact, you may be far from the home stretch. Nevertheless, this is the perfect time for you to also heal and get the support of your family and friends.

You can also seek professional individual counseling and marriage counseling, which will help you better deal with life during and after rehab. This will allow you to have deeper insight into your loved ones problems so that you can be better equipped to offer support and encouragement.

 

One thought on “4 Simple Things You Should Know About Your Loved One’s Rehab

    […] 4 Simple Things You Should Know About Your Loved One’s Rehab […]

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